No one likes Emma, everybody loves Emma

I have a confession to make: I haven’t read Jane Austen. I mean… I have. But not much. I read Pride and Prejudice in Spanish when I was a teenager. And I just reread it in English last year. And this year I read Emma.

I chose this book for the prompt of a Classic in Translation of the Back to the Classics 2018 challenge. Emma was translated into Spanish by Sergio Pitol, one of the most important Mexican writers (he actually died in April) who has an amazing translation work. I wasn’t sure I wanted to read Jane Austen in Spanish, but when I saw this book, I was instantly sold. Sergio Pitol has translated from Chinese, English, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, and Russian… so it had to be an amazing translation. And it definitely was.

There’s nothing much to say about Emma. There are academic careers based on this book (and Jane Austen’s work), so there’s really nothing I could say to add to the conversation.

Emma is a novel by Jane Austen, published in 1815 that tells the story of a not so likeable young lady who likes to read named Emma Woodhouse. She thinks she’s a good matchmaker, but she really isn’t. And she always confuses feelings and actions and tries to manipulate everyone around her. But in the end you can’t but love her.

I loved the journey Jane Austen made me take. Her portrayal of life in rural England with Highbury was just amazing. Centuries later you can actually *feel* you’re there. And the characters… woah… so complex and thick. Of course, something everyone talks about is Emma’s feminist views and agency. She doesn’t want to get married because she actually can… she can afford it. And that’s amazing.

I love Jane Austen and I will read all her books soon.

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